Walkin’ Wheels Second-Hand Wheelchairs

Dog wheelchairs

Does your dog need a wheelchair?

How do you know when your dog needs a wheelchair?

This is a difficult question and one we pondered on for quite a while, probably too long. It can be a big investment, so it needs to offer a lot of benefits.

With Daisy and her DM, we knew only too well the progression of the illness, but we had no idea whether a wheelchair would help her or if she would even accept it.

We eventually decided we would go ahead and try one when she still had use of all 4 legs. DM was creeping along, and she was already unsteady on her back legs but could still run and walk about indoors.

If you are struggling with this same conundrum, why not read this article for some inspiration: Dog Wheelchair – Independent Dog Wheelchair Reviews – Canine Compilation

Which is the best wheelchair for my dog?

Walkin' Wheels Wheelchairs

Walkin’ Wheels Wheelchairs

Another difficult question. We started out buying a second-hand Eddies Wheels wheelchair that wasn’t the ideal size for Daisy. However, we spent a lot of time and effort customising it to fit her needs. We pretty much took it apart and put it back together again in a way that suited her best. It was perfect for a few months but then started to deteriorate. We found ourselves constantly repairing it on every outing.

Her second wheelchair was from Best Friends. It was also used and on loan to us from a charity. This one was a much better fit, but our customising options were limited since it didn’t belong to us. Several other dogs had used it before we got it, so again, it was in constant need of repair. When we noticed that Daisy was struggling on her front legs, we looked around for something more suitable.

We came across Walkin’ Wheels and purchased the 4-wheel option to future-proof it. This wheelchair was the perfect fit. We were impressed by how customisable it was out of the box and the sturdiness of the frame. She seemed far more comfortable in this one than the previous ones.

Will my dog take to a wheelchair?

Daisy in her Walkin' Wheels Wheelchair

Daisy in her camo Walkin’ Wheels Wheelchair

For us, this was the most critical question and one that could only be addressed the first time we put her in it.

At first, the answer was no! She refused to move. Remember, she still had the use of four legs. She much preferred being walked in a sling where she would run around quite happily with one of us trying to keep up with her.

By combining her sling with her first wheelchair, we finally got her to use it. Once she realised she had her freedom back and could chase her beloved Puller, there was no stopping her – all she had needed was the right motivation.

Wheelchairs are not just for dogs

Walkin' Wheels Wheelchairs for cats

Other animals can benefit from a wheelchair

We’ve seen cats, goats, sheep, and even ducks benefit from a wheelchair, whether it be long-term or short-term, to cope with surgery or injury.

Take a look at our range of second-hand, hardly used wheelchairs

Second-hand Walkin' Wheels Wheelchairs

Second-hand Walkin’ Wheels Wheelchairs

If you face this dilemma and are undecided, we are now offering a range of second-hand/hardly used Walkin’ Wheels Wheelchairs for sale.

We may not have the ideal size available for your dog, so if you don’t see what you need or would like further advice, please contact us, and we will be happy to help.

Daisy

We never did use the front wheels. We lost Daisy in December 2019 and miss her every day. She was such a character. One thing we don’t ever regret was getting her that wheelchair. Watching her run around in her Wakin’ Wheels wheelchair was our greatest pleasure and left us with many happy memories. It gave her back some of what DM had taken away, and you could see on her face how happy and contented she was pottering around the field, sniffing out rabbits – just one of the gang and being a normal dog in her last few months.

Daisy in her Walkin' Wheels Wheelchair

Daisy – just one of the gang!

Licking Mats – Simple but Smart

What is a licking mat?

First and foremost, what is a licking mat? A licking mat is a plastic or silicone mat that can be smeared with a variety of different treats. These can include wet food, pastes, peanut butter or plain yoghurt – anything really that is spreadable and enjoyed by your pet. They come in a wide assortment of shapes and sizes but all of them have patterns of cavities and grooves to hold the treats.

Why would you want a licking mat?

Both dogs and cats find the act of repetitive licking soothing which can calm an anxious pet, so by participating in an activity that causes them to lick, they are releasing cortisol into their body – a hormone responsible for relaxation. Licking mats are a great way to help promote calm behaviour.

If you have pets that eat too quickly, you can extend their feeding time with a licking mat making them eat more slowly, produce more saliva and aid digestion. This also aids dental health helping fight off bacteria in the mouth.

And of course the big buzzword at the moment “enrichment”. The licking mat can provide mental stimulation which promotes mental health. A mentally stimulated pet is a healthy pet.

Licking mats can also be frozen thereby extending the game longer by presenting a greater challenge or maybe provide some much-needed refreshment in the hotter months.

When should you use a licking mat?

As a distraction. Maybe you’re still working from home and need time to make that Zoom call in peace.

How about bath time, nail trimming, grooming? You can get licking mats that stick on the wall, and on windows when out on a car journey.

Perhaps on Bonfire night? Something to soothe an anxious pet and take their mind off their fears.

If your pet is confined to a crate due to illness or an operation, and they need a low-impact boredom buster.

Trixie Junior Licking Plate

Trixie Junior Licking Plate

To distract and entertain your new puppy or kitten.

As a slow feeder, and of course, as a reward. At the end of a great training session, for example.

Just because you love them!

A useful addition to your toolkit

Aquapaw Feeding Mat Licking Toy

In summary, you may already have a whole stash of puzzle toys to keep your pet entertained but we believe it’s worthwhile adding this simple yet effective soothing slow feeder to your toolkit.

Bear in mind that these mats can be a chewing hazard so should only be used when supervised.

Our range of Licking Toys:

Licking Toys

Licking Toys range from left to right: iQuites Lick Treat Mat, Trixie Lick n Snack Ball, Junior Licking Plate from Trixie, Trixie Lick n Snack Platter, Aquapaw Feeding Mat Licking Toy

iQuites Treat Lick Mats

Trixie Lick N Snack Ball

Junior Licking Plate from Trixie

Trixie Lick n Snack Platter

Aquapaw Slow Treater Dog Feeding Mat Licking Toy

Calm Dog Games

Calm Dog Games

What is Calm Dog Games?

Calm Dog Games is a beautifully presented pack of cards, wonderfully illustrated with different dog breeds. It contains 52 individual challenges for dogs, along with a guide booklet to help you on your way.

As has been proven, mental stimulation can be just as engaging and demanding as physical exercise for the active canine. In situations such as our current lockdown or maybe for disabled dogs, or dogs recovering from surgery, or even just bad weather, these cards are the perfect solution.

The five categories

Calm Dog Games categories

The cards are divided into 5 different categories; Puzzle, Bond, Focus, Calm and Play, so you can quickly select an appropriate activity for your mood or desired aim. The categories are a mixture of scent games, stealth training, brain games, enrichment activities and bonding exercises to strengthen your relationship.

Whether you are training a pup, settling in a new rescue, or just spending time with your four-legged bestie, these games are great to help you bond, train and have fun together. Add joy, stimulation and enrichment to their day while developing positive behaviours such as calmness, confidence and connection with you.

How to play

  • PICK A CARD – Select from a category or choose from the whole deck.
  • FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS – Play the game for 60 seconds to 5 minutes max.
  • PLAY AGAIN OR CHILL – 3-5 games over the course of the day is sufficient.

(Some games require additional equipment)

From the creator

Creator of Calm Dog Games

Calm Dog Games is, first and foremost, for the love of dogs. Inspired by my own spaniel, Cam, my desire was to give him an interesting and enriching life.

Dogs really are the best of us, and they deserve to be listened to and heard. I believe many behavioural issues can be remedied through clear communication, gentle understanding and positive reinforcement. In essence, a calm default.

My aim is to help empower other people who have a dog in their life with the tools and strategies to communicate and connect with their dog, develop calmness and build upon that all-important bond.

Calmness isn’t just for dogs, it’s for us too.

What people are saying about Calm Dog Games

Calm Dog Games

“Great for any dog lover. Lovely cards with some great games on them. Simple ideas well thought out. Glad I bought them. I feel I have an ace up my sleeve with these.”

“A handy resource for enrichment and training. These cards are a great way to find games that will help you boost the behaviours you want from your dog.
Being able to pick a card at random is an easy way to make sure you include variety in your play.

They’re great for rainy days and handy for holidays, and they include lots of ideas that would work for dogs who are on restricted exercise.

I especially like the little book that explains the thinking behind the games and how to take them to the next level as your dog becomes an expert.

On top of that, they’re very pretty and easy to wrap, so I am working out who I can buy them for as a gift.”

“Honestly brilliant!

These are great little fun games to help focus, calm bond and play with my dog, and I love the fact that it has a little book that has higher levels of you can train further. It’s compact to carry around and to just whip one out, I really enjoy doing the focus games with my pup while out walking!”

Archie in the snow

Archie’s Op

Archie in the snow

Archie hasn’t always been such a handsome boy

Archie is one of the only dogs we’ve had who hasn’t spent a great deal of time at the vet during his adult life.

This wasn’t the case when he was a young pup.

We bought him locally and he was clearly the runt of the litter. After a few days with us, we realised he really wasn’t very healthy. His coat was in terrible condition. He had bald patches where his fur had fallen out, and he was very skinny.

Archie as a sickly pup
Archie pup

The vet was initially puzzled but when we told her what we fed him, she immediately blamed his raw diet. It was difficult sticking to our guns, but we had fed our dogs a raw diet for years. During that time we had seen huge improvements, not only in their health, but also in their behaviour after we switched from dried kibble. Despite the criticism, we continued with his diet, along with medicated baths every day for his itchy patches.

We find the root of the problem

Although the breeder had previously wormed him, it became clear that the cause of all his problems was indeed worms. As soon as we cleared that up, he blossomed. The vet was astonished at the change in him, as were we.

Archie blossomed into a beautiful boy
A couple of months down the line and he blossomed

He went from an ugly duckling to a swan almost overnight and has not had any major problems since.

Last year we noticed a lump at the base of his neck, just above his shoulder. It wasn’t huge and we know that older dogs (he’s nearly ten now) get lumps and bumps. However, it continued to grow, so we took him to the vet. They said it was probably a cyst, and tests later confirmed this to be the case.

Visiting the vet in lockdown

We were advised to leave it alone but keep an eye on it. It got bigger still, so we really wanted to take him back to the vet for a check-up. With lockdown in place, it proved difficult to get an appointment. We had to wait a week or so and in the meantime the lump burst. Or it may have been helped on its way by Archie’s toenail!

Despite our best efforts, we couldn’t get an immediate appointment so instead, sent them a picture of the wound. As it wasn’t what they considered to be an emergency, we continued to wait. In the meantime, we kept it as clean as possible.

Eventually, we got our appointment. The wound was cleaned up and he was given antibiotics. These didn’t help. We got stronger ones and at last, it looked like it was healing. But then pus started seeping from the wound again.

We decided enough was enough and booked him in for surgery.

Thanks to lockdown, we can’t accompany him inside the vets. He has to be handed over and collected at the door. We have to stand outside in the freezing cold for the consultation, but it’s completely understandable and better than no consultation at all!

No cone of shame for Archie

He had his op and seemed completely unfazed by it all. Now we just need to ensure that it has time to heal properly. A cone is no use (thank goodness) because of the location of the cyst. Luckily, we happened to have a Vetgood Veterinary dog boot which is on his back foot to help prevent any damage to the wound should he attempt to scratch it. And he’s definitely given it a try!

All we can do now is wait and hope that this time it heals up completely.

Archie as he is today
Our gorgeous boy today

Unleash the festive cheer this Christmas!

Seasons Greetings from Training Lines

The year we would all rather forget

It’s been one hell of a year! Who could have imagined this time last year when we were sending out our Christmas greetings, what was in store for us all?

So many people have worked so hard during this awful pandemic to keep us all going and none more so than our outstanding National Health Service. We hope that everyone involved will have some time to chill-out over the festive period and maybe reconnect with loved ones, even if it is at a distance.

Thanking our NHS

And for us, it’s quite poignant as it was just days after Christmas that we lost our beloved Daisy. She has left a massive hole in our lives.

Daisy dog in wheelchair

Remembering our beautiful Daisy dog 2009-2019

Let the old year-end and the New Year begin

But we can only look forward, so out with the old, in with the new – make way for 2021! Wishing you and your fur family a peaceful, safe and healthy Christmas, and much happiness, and prosperity in the New Year!

To squeak or not to squeak

To Squeak or not to Squeak, that is the Question?

Do your dogs like squeaky toys, and if so, why?

The theory is that your dog is motivated by an instinctual drive and the squeaky noise is not unlike the sound of prey that’s frightened or injured. When the squeak stops, your dog has successfully killed its prey.

Or maybe there’s another explanation; dogs get an immediate reward from the sound that’s emitted from the toy. The feedback tells them that their bite is effective, thus spurring them on to continue, unlike with a silent toy which doesn’t provide the same gratification.

We all know what it’s like when a dog is obsessed with a squeaky toy and it can drive us nuts, until, in the end, we take it away, much to the disappointment of the dog.

Not all Dogs love a Squeak

With our dogs, we have to be very careful. Tilly absolutely loves a squeaky toy. Archie and Jack aren’t bothered one way or the other, but Toby dislikes them intensely. More than that, they actually upset him.

He is not particularly sound sensitive. He loves the sound of a clicker! Thunder or fireworks don’t bother him in the slightest, but anything that squeaks or beeps will have him running for cover.

We once took him to agility classes and at first, he did well until another dog in his class came along with a squeaky toy. That was the end of it for Toby. He couldn’t concentrate and he spent the whole time cowering behind our legs.

When Tilly was confined to her crate after her surgeries, we gave her a fluffy lamb to keep her company, but first, it had to be operated on to remove the squeaker. We couldn’t risk traumatising Toby.

When new toys arrive in the warehouse, we are very wary about testing the squeak and usually wait until Toby is out of earshot otherwise he’ll be upset and fearful for hours.

It’s not that he doesn’t like toys, he loves the treat dispensers, especially Starmark and of course, KONG. Then there’s his all-time favourite, the Puller, but anything that makes a noise is a no-no for him.

It’s a good idea to take the time to find out what toys your dog likes and dislikes and what stimulates or comforts them. A squeaky toy can be a great motivator and grab your dog’s attention, thereby making an excellent training tool but beware it doesn’t have the opposite effect.

Regular Checking of Toys is a Must

Supervision with a squeaky toy is advised especially with dogs that get overstimulated easily. Squeaky play should be confined to short sessions and ask your dog to do something like sit or down before rewarding them with the toy.

Squeaky toys can be fun but inspect them regularly to make sure they are not damaged and that your dog doesn’t have access to the squeaking mechanism, which could become a choking hazard.

If you discover their favourite squeaky toy is damaged, then repair it or replace it with a new one.

The Ultimate Squeak

If you have a squeaky-obsessed dog, The Petsafe Ricochet is an excellent choice. These paired toys will have your dog going back and forth chasing the squeak. Tilly was enthralled with them but sadly cannot play with them in our home!

Petsafe Electronic Dog Toy Ricochet

Petsafe Ricochet: The ultimate squeak

The Thrill of the Chase or Food Fun

For those, like us that have a dog who is upset by a squeak, here are Toby’s Top Tips for squeaky-free fun:

Toby

Pet Insurance – Is it worth it?

Toby turns four

The birthday boy – Toby

The Birthday Boy

Our Toby celebrated his fourth birthday this month, just as we were celebrating two months of no vet bills. That quickly changed as our accident-prone shepherd suddenly started licking the pads of his front paws non-stop.

We examined him thoroughly but could see nothing obvious, and still the licking continued and became more frenzied. The licking was soon followed by limping.

So it was off to the vet with him and not a moment too soon as he was sporting a gash over his left eye that he had sustained from smacking into a door frame when he wasn’t looking where he was going! The vet examined his eye, and although swollen, it looked like it would heal okay, so no treatment was necessary. As for his paws, he had some red patches between his pads which could mean a contact allergy. Our choices were either a shampoo for his paws or Apoquel. We decided on the Apoquel, which relieves allergic itching, as we were familiar with it and had experienced good results with Fin.

Toby wearing his Trixie Walker Active Protective Dog Boots

These boots are made for walking

For two weeks he took two tabs a day and needed boots to break the itch/scratch cycle. That was easy for us; we chose the Trixie Walker Active Protective Dog Boots for when he went out on his walks. When he was indoors, we used Vetgood Slim Protective Veterinary Dog Boots.

By the end of the two weeks, Toby was much improved and we were relieved, if a little poorer!

Should you insure?

We took the decision many years ago when we had five shepherds, all insured and costing us a fortune every month, to cancel our pet insurance. Instead we vowed to put away an amount each month for any unexpected occurrences. At that time our dogs were relatively young, very healthy and rarely needed the vet, so the monthly expenditure seemed a total waste of money.

As they got older, this started to change, but then the premiums would, of course, have risen to reflect their ages.

And as for putting money aside, or self-insurance, as it’s called, we quickly forgot about that!

Towards the end of their lives, our five shepherds, none of whom were now insured, racked up hundreds of pounds in vet bills. However, we’d saved ourselves hundreds of pounds in premiums, so we may just have broken even, or even come out slightly ahead.

But pet insurance is not just about illness. Some policies cover a whole host of other things such as theft, treatment for behavioural problems, liability cover and kennel or cattery fees should you yourself become ill and unable to look after them.

Is pet insurance worth it?

With hindsight, we would have insured both Toby and Tilly; Tilly’s elbow arthroscopy cost an arm and a leg. We would also have been able to claim for any hydrotherapy she has going forward. Toby has ripped open his shoulder and his tail due to his clumsiness and heaven knows what he’ll do next. Insuring those two would have been a good investment.

Jack has also had a major op. He swallowed something which caused an obstruction in his gut and had to be removed. So far, Archie has needed very little veterinary treatment. He’s getting on a bit now, so no doubt problems will start to crop up.

Pet insurance is a safety net, most obviously used for veterinary bills, but as mentioned above, there are other benefits. It can seem like an unnecessary expense – until you need it! What does it cost, what should it include, and what are the alternatives? We came across a good article discussing the pros and cons of taking out an insurance policy on your pet, so if you are unsure whether to insure, why not read Pet insurance – Do you need it?

Archie wearing Julius K9 Saddlebags

Dog Backpacks – The Positive Benefits

 

Dog wearing Julius K9 Saddlebags

Archie wearing Julius-K9 Saddlebags

The positive benefits of a backpack

Dog backpacks can have many positive benefits for your canine and can turn a basic walk into a rewarding experience.

It gives your dog a job

Many types of dogs like to be engaged in activities, and a dog backpack can help to give your pup a purpose. When they’re wearing their backpack, they know they’re helping in a tangible way, which will make them happier and ultimately, healthier. If you have a small or ageing dog,  an empty backpack is just as effective. They will still feel they have a job!

It calms them down

A bit like a pressure wrap for anxious dogs, a backpack can help to calm your dog and make them feel more secure.

Helps them focus

Is your dog distracted on walks? Maybe it’s other dogs, cars or bikes. A backpack can set them into work mode and help them focus and disregard the distractions.

They carry their stuff

Poop bags, for instance! You never have enough hands or pockets so why not fill the backpack with a collapsible bowl, water bottle, tasty treats and even a basic first aid kit?

It’s a workout and can build muscle

An extended hike with a well-balanced backpack can result in a good workout and help build muscle, and even on those dismal days when ‘walkies’ time is shorter, they will still get a decent amount of exercise.

Walking together strengthens your bond

Put the backpack on whether it’s a long hike in the woods or a quick trot around the park, walking together strengthens your bond and both of you will sleep better for it.

Dog wearing Julius-K9 Saddlebags

Improves physical and mental health

Walking is good for the body and the mind for both you and your pup. Not only does it increase stamina, but during regular exercise, dopamine levels in the body increase, which is associated with improved mood and a happier outlook on life.

Top Tips to teach your dog to wear a backpack

Step 1: Choose the right backpack for the job. Is it for long hikes or a quick jog around the park?

Step 2: Measure your dog to ensure you get a good fit.

Step 3: Get them used to the backpack. Let them see it and sniff it before attempting to put it on.

Step 4: When they wear it for the first time, let them get used to the empty weight of it on their back and adjust to walking through gaps with it on.

Step 5: Start slowly and add items to the backpack so that they get used to carrying a bit of weight. Do short walks at first.

Step 6: Gradually add items so they can get used to balancing and manoeuvring with the filled backpack in place.

Step 7: When they’re comfortable with it, go off and have adventures!

Adventure Hund also have some excellent advice on How to Train Your Dog to Wear a Backpack.

Dog wearing Julius-K9 Saddlebags

Archie, ready for an adventure!

See our range of Dog Backpacks and start your adventures here!

Wheels for Hope Margo

Rescue dog in Romania with her Walkin' Wheels

Hope Margo in her new Walkin’ Wheels

Wheels to Romania

We recently received a wheelchair order from a customer in the USA, which we shipped to a dog rescue in Romania. A week or so later, we were delighted to receive this picture from Negris place – dog rescue (WARNING: this Facebook page does show some distressing images) where we got to see Hope Margo’s first outing in her shiny new wheels. This beautiful soul was hit by a car and left by the road until she was discovered in a bad way two days later.

Rescue dog in Romania recovering from surgery

Hope Margo recovering from surgery

She had surgery and has made an amazing recovery, and thanks to the tireless efforts of the rescue and the generosity of the wheelchair donor, she is now ready to embark on a new life in a loving family home.

Could you rescue a pet?

We have been lucky enough to have shared our lives with two amazing rescue GSDs from Vigil GSD Rescue, Blitz and Fin. They were both fantastic dogs. It took a while for them to settle in and they never truly got along together. However, we were able to find a simple way to manage that situation and both dogs led wonderfully happy, fulfilled lives with us. Watching them blossom after their unsettled start was a lovely experience.

If you are seriously considering taking on a rescue animal and giving them a fresh start in a new home, you may face a few challenges to start with, but you too can discover just how immensely rewarding it can be.

Adopt don’t Shop

Taking on a dog or any pet is a huge commitment. If you have decided that it’s for you, then it’s worthwhile thinking Adopt Don’t Shop!

Pet rescue organisations in the UK:

Walkin’ Wheels Wheelchairs

Gardening with Pets in Mind

Time to mow the lawn

Time to mow!

The Garden Revolution

During the lockdown, there seems to have been a huge trend to transform the humble garden into something more glamorous. Areas that were perhaps neglected and were the domain of dogs, cats and rabbits are suddenly becoming our sanctuaries of peace and quiet, giving somewhere to sit in the hot weather, dine alfresco, or splash about in a pool or hot tub. Many have even created their own garden pubs!

Our lockdown project also focused on our garden. We have finally transformed an area that was once inhabited by chickens that ate every green shoot that reared its head, ducks who paddled around to create a huge mud bath, to something far more lush and sophisticated.

Ducks and chickens

Before

Garden transformation

After

We should stress that this whole transformation has not been achieved during the lockdown. We have made several smaller changes over two or three years. However, it is fair to say that the garden has received a lot more of our attention over the last few months, as we have concentrated on creating a space that we could enjoy and feel proud of, and also to offer a haven to wildlife rather than poultry.

Wildflower garden with poppies

Buzzing with life

Grass, is it a Green Issue?

Grass has been a big talking point and as we all know, our dogs are not always kind to our lawns.

Their urine tends to burn yellow patches, and faeces needs to be disposed of. There are always holes to be dug, too, if your pooch gets the urge!

We have seen some amazing transformations on social media and one of the biggest trends seems to be artificial grass.

Artificial grassCan artificial grass, AstroTurf, be a  good alternative to the real thing? It’s come a long way over the last few years but is it really a viable alternative?

Pros and Cons

Surely the best things about it are:

  • It should look perfect all year round
  • It will never need watering or mowing
  • Weeding is unnecessary.

But it is not without maintenance, and:

  • It’s expensive to install
  • It gets very hot in the sun
  • It’s not considered to be environmentally friendly
  • It’s not wildlife-friendly
  • It needs to be cleaned

Artificial grass with stripes

It can even come with stripes!

Did you know you can buy a special hoover for artificial grass?

Despite the fact that even in the northeast of Scotland, our newly-sprouted lawn needs mowing once a week, we have not been tempted to take the artificial grass route. Perhaps you have? We would be interested to hear your experiences as a pet owner, and whether you have found it to be a truly a good alternative.

Making your Garden Pet Friendly

Of course, grass is only one part of a garden, and for pets there could be all sorts of other hazards lurking out there. Gardener’s World offers some top tips for keeping your garden pet- friendly by pointing out robust plants that can survive the onslaught of cats and dogs, and also poisonous plants that you may not have given a thought to (such as tomato plants).

Foxgloves can be poisonous for pets

Foxglove

We have an abundance of foxgloves in particular, which can be toxic.

Apart from the obvious things like ensuring you have a secure fence and/or gate, there are other hazards to consider: garden chemicals, and wee beasties like slugs. And don’t forget to secure your compost bins which may contain food scraps that might prove very attractive to dogs.

But hazards aside, remember to create some interesting and stimulating areas for your pet. A designated play area, and even a toileting area. With a little training, they will quickly learn to use it, and everyone can reap the benefits of a well-tended garden!

For us, and I’m sure for many others in this period of lockdown, the garden has been an absolute lifesaver and has brought much pleasure to peoples’ lives. After all the hard work that we’ve put into them, let’s all enjoy our gardens and our pets safely, whatever we chose to grow in them.